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    • New note by bobjonkman 17 June 2018
      OK, time to do some bicycle tuning and fixing. Maybe pictures later.
    • New note by bobjonkman 17 June 2018
      When I was young people would call me "Young fella", and I would be insulted because they couldn't see past my age. Now that I'm a #duffer people call me "Young fella" and I'm insulted because all they see is my age...
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by algernon 3 June 2018
      RT @algernon @kensanata I've made plans with friends & family to - in case of my untimely demise - continue running my domains, and serve a static snapshot of contents. All the tools to do this are prepared, all passwords in a KeePassXC database, etc. I've written up instructions about what needs to be shut […]
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      bobjonkman favorited something by algernon: @kensanata I've made plans with friends & family to - in case of my untimely demise - continue running my domains, and serve a static snapshot of contents. All the tools to do this are prepared, all passwords in a KeePassXC database, etc. I've written up instructions about what needs […]
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by kensanata 3 June 2018
      RT @kensanata We tell each other to self host in order to escape the big corps. But when we die, all the self hosted stuff is going to get wiped and history will only remember the archives that got stored by the big corps. And you know how history is written by the winners. Do […]
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      bobjonkman favorited something by kensanata: We tell each other to self host in order to escape the big corps. But when we die, all the self hosted stuff is going to get wiped and history will only remember the archives that got stored by the big corps. And you know how history is written by […]
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      bobjonkman favorited something by lnxw48a1: I wanted to make a joke about this cold, but while I still have the cold, the joke is "snot funny".
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by seanl 25 May 2018
      RT @seanl Chrome isn't a web browser. It's a tentacle of Google that takes over your computer, spies on you, and controls everything you see.
    • New note by bobjonkman 25 May 2018
      Must have been someone else. The only static website generator I've used is a text editor :-) There's a bunch of #WordPress installations I maintain, and I run a MediaWiki instance. Neither qualifies as "static"... / @mcscx2 @steckhalter
    • New note by bobjonkman 22 May 2018
      In addition to SMTP there's !XMPP and #IRC, but you're right, they don't have mainstream adoption (unless you consider the bastardized versions produced by Cisco and Slack)

Archive for the 'Politics' Category

At the Canadian Open Data Experience event, 14 January 2015

Posted by Bob Jonkman on 18th January 2015

Open Data logo

Open Data

On Wednesday, 14 January 2015 I registered for the Canadian Open Data Experience event called “Economic Potential of Open Data”. Speakers were to be Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board; James Moore, Minister of Industry; and Ray Sharma, creator of the Canadian Open Data Experience (CODE).

Before the presentations started Tony Clement was off in a side office, unavailable for networking, and he left immediately after his presentation. James Moore was not present at all. For an Open Data event that promotes Open Government, it was a bit disappointing not to have access to the government ministers responsible for openness.

Here are some of the notes I took during the speakers’ presentations. My comments are indicated (like this).

Tony Clement, President of the Treasury Board:
  • Tony Clement referred to January 2014’s CODE event as the “first Open Data hackathon” in Canada (yet Open Data Waterloo Region has been holding Open Data Hackathons and CodeFest events since 2011)
  • CODE hackathon had 900 participants, with the spotlight on the business value of Open Data
  • “Electric Sheep” was the winner of the hackathon
  • Tony Clement and James Moore are making this road trip to announce 20 — 22 February 2015 as the CODE2015 Hackathon
  • Dates intentionally chosen to coincide with the International Open Data Hackathon; hopes to have international coexistence
  • There will be cash prizes for the top three apps created during the CODE hackathon
  • Tony Clement gave some words of praise to the Canadian government, saying that Open Data allows Canada to “compete with the world”.
Ray Sharma, creator of Canadian Open Data Experience:
  • Weather and GPS are commercially successful applications of Open Data
  • National competition had 930 participants
  • Ray Sharma talked of the “power of the crowd”, mentioning Litebox, WordPress, Kickstarter and Goldcorp
  • The economic potential of Open Data is like an iceberg — most of it is below the surface
  • There will be three hubs participating in the CODE2015 hackathon: Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal
  • The 2nd Generation of apps will use Open Data and Private Data, e.g. Zillo
Lan Nguyen, Deputy CIO for City of Toronto:
  • Toronto Open Data started in 2009 (although I remember Toronto setting up a blank Open Data web page after the Smart Cities conference in 2006)
  • Open Data is part of Toronto’s Open Government
  • There’s a long list of Open Datasets — Petabytes!
  • Unexpected benefits: silos of ownership; “See, Click, Fix” received 3,000 requests!
  • Commercialization of Toronto Open Data
  • Availability of budget and Council data
  • Transparent, engage citizens
  • Able to understand the outcome of Open Data
  • Liability, risk?
  • Open Data is available to everyone; it is Social Justice
  • Crowd sourcing: Encourage commercialization; partner with educational institutions
  • Next plan: Open Dashboard — reports from different stakeholders
  • Open Data is a powerful driver for Open Government
Devin Tu, founder of Map Your Property:
  • Idea for Map Your Property came from the fact that California has a single portal for geodata
  • MYP aggregates multiple datasets
  • Reports are made available in Microsoft .docx format and maps are exported as .pdf files (Oh great, Open Data in proprietary, non-consumable formats)
  • Benefits of Open Data: Entrepreneurs go to those places where there is Open Data
  • It is expensive to do business in places that don’t have Open Data!
Ryan Doherty, co-founder of IAmSick.ca:
  • Goal of IAmSick.ca: Reduce Emergency Room wait times
  • Integrated datasets? (speaking with Ryan Doherty after the presentation, I learned that much data was collected manually)
  • User tracking provides estimated wait times (are users aware their use of IAmSick.ca is being tracked? What information on users is retained? This could be a privacy leak nightmare waiting to happen. Speaking with Ryan Doherty afterwards, he assured me there was no medical information about users collected)
  • Improving business — efficiency in care delivery was apparent later

I found the focus on business interests and the competitive aspects of the CODE2015 hackathon a bit disconcerting. A cynic would say business is using $40,000 prize money in a competition as cheap bait to attract programmers to work for 24 hours straight. At 900 participants, that works out to paying only about $2.00/hour per programmer. And only four teams split the prize money, so most programmers go completely unpaid.

Still, CODE2015 only has three competitive hackathons on a weekend where the International Open Data Day holds hundreds of cooperative hackathons.

I hope OpenDataWR holds an event this year — the ones in 2013 and 2014 were fun, productive for some, and educational for all.

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Posted in Business, Open Data, Politics | 2 Comments »

Shutting down ServiceOntario kiosks could be Considered Harmful

Posted by Bob Jonkman on 9th November 2012

Service Ontario kiosk with "Temporarily shut down" notice

ServiceOntario kiosk

The Ontario government has announced it is shutting down the ServiceOntario kiosks.

Closing the kiosks won’t do any good if the web site is no better secured. ServiceOntario had control over the hardware and software running on the kiosks, but they have no control over the computers people use to access the ServiceOntario web site. User PCs will have all sorts of malware running on them, and malusers can far more easily spend time breaking into a web site than a kiosk. Unless ServiceOntario has much better security on their web site, it is far more vulnerable than a kiosk.

In his article Government to discontinue ServiceOntario kiosks, Sameer Vasta asks if the ServiceOntario web site is ready to pick up the slack. His conclusion is yes, and although the web site user experience could be improved, he considers closing the kiosks a prudent move. But if the kiosk interface was so much easier to use, then the web site could use that interface too. Security isn’t created by the user interface — security needs to be built into the servers. Malusers are unlikely to use the web interface to launch their attacks; they’ll have more sophisticated tools to try to break into the servers.

Of course, since the ServiceOntario web site was already in place while the kiosks were operational it has been a potential vector for attack all along. Closing the kiosks doesn’t increase that vulnerability. And the vulnerability that prompted the government to shut down the kiosks was card skimming, which is not an issue on a Web site accessed from home. But shutting down a fully managed kiosk to be replaced by home users’ PCs that are full of malware does not look like a prudent move to me.

However, it should be cheaper to manage security on one web site than on 72 kiosks. The government reports that shutting the kiosks will save taxpayers about $6.3 million in one-time upgrading costs and $2.2 million in annual maintenance costs. The Star reports that Minister of Government Services Harinder Takhar says the kiosks cost $4 million to deploy, and it will cost $250,000 to remove them.

And shutting down the kiosks has one other benefit: If a security breach occurs as a result of using our own computers then ServiceOntario has successfully shifted blame, hasn’t it? Surely there will be a disclaimer in the fine print on the website somewhere!

–Bob.


ServiceOntario kiosk "Permanently Closed" notice

“Permanently Closed” notice Service Ontario kiosk.

The picture above shows a ServiceOntario kiosk with a notice indicating the kiosk is temporarily shut down. A new notice has been posted, which reads:

ServiceOntario Kiosks Are Now Permanently Closed.

After a thorough investigation into the safety and security issues surrounding ServiceOntario kiosks, it has been decided to permanently shut down the network.

All former kiosk services are conveniently available online, including:

  • License plate sticker renewal
  • Address change
  • Driver abstract

Fermeture permanente des kiosques ServiceOntario.

À la suite d’une enquête approfondie sur les problèmes de sécurité survenus dans les kiosques ServiceOntario, il a été décidé de fermer le réseau de façon permanente.

Tous les services anciennement founis dal les kiosques son offerts en ligne, notamment les suivants:

  • Renouvellement de la vignette d’immatriculation
  • Changement d’addresse
  • Résumé de dossier de conducteur.

We look forward to serving you.
For these services, and more than 40 other online services, or for a complete list of our locations and available services, please visit ServiceOntario.ca

Au plaisir de vous servir.
Pour ces services, et plus de 40 autres services en ligne, ou la liste complète de nos centres et de leurs services, visitez ServiceOntario.ca

Images courtesy of lothlaurien.ca used under a CC BYCreative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada License license.

Thanx to my friend RW for the idea for this post, and her contributions.

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Posted in considered harmful, Politics, security | 4 Comments »

 
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