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    • New note by bobjonkman 3 October 2020
      There's also Megablocks, the precursor to Duplo. And there are also Micro Megablocks, the same size as LEGO. The kits for Micro Megablocks were much better than the LEGO kits, making slightly larger models but using only standard bricks. The LEGO models were smaller, depending on many custom pieces specific to the kit, which were […]
    • Favorite 3 October 2020
      bobjonkman favorited something by clacke: Not only are Duplo blocks *like* Lego blocks, they *are* Lego blocks, and I don't just mean that Duplo is a Lego brand and produced in the same factory, the two systems are actually compatible.A Lego 2x2 block fits and sticks to the underside of a Duplo block, and the […]
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by clacke 3 October 2020
      RT @clacke Not only are Duplo blocks *like* Lego blocks, they *are* Lego blocks, and I don't just mean that Duplo is a Lego brand and produced in the same factory, the two systems are actually compatible. A Lego 2x2 block fits and sticks to the underside of a Duplo block, and the nob on […]
    • Favorite 27 September 2020
      bobjonkman favorited something by clacke: > At least as far as we’re aware, however, this is the first time that a pirated copy of a movie has actually been shown at a cinema in the United States. And surely, it must be the first instance where a pirated copy has been obtained from a torrent […]
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by tobias 27 September 2020
      RT @tobias ♲ @frederic: "Starting this Thanksgiving I am going to write a complete Unix-compatible software system called GNU (for Gnu's Not Unix), and give it away free to everyone who can use it." September 27, 1983 - Richard Stallman. www.gnu.org/gnu/initial-announ… Happy birthday to GNU \0/
    • Favorite 27 September 2020
      bobjonkman favorited something by tobias: ♲ @frederic@pouet.couchet.org: "Starting this Thanksgiving I am going to write a complete Unix-compatible software system called GNU (for Gnu's Not Unix), and give it away free to everyone who can use it." September 27, 1983 - Richard Stallman. www.gnu.org/gnu/initial-announ…Happy birthday to GNU \0/
    • bobjonkman repeated a notice by lxoliva 27 September 2020
      RT @lxoliva happy original software freedom day! on this day, 37 years ago, Richard Stallman launched the Free Software Movement, and the GNU Project, to build a user-freedom-respecting operating system, so that all users could do their computing in freedom
    • Favorite 27 September 2020
      bobjonkman favorited something by lxoliva: happy original software freedom day! on this day, 37 years ago, Richard Stallman launched the Free Software Movement, and the GNU Project, to build a user-freedom-respecting operating system, so that all users could do their computing in freedom
    • New note by bobjonkman 22 September 2020
      In the Netherlands (which the Dutch call "Nederland") the language is called "Nederlands", so that makes sense. Perhaps English speakers couldn't differentiate between "Nederlands" and "Deutsch", which corrupted to "Dutch". And why do we call the country "Germany" and the inhabitants "Germans" when they call their country "Deutschland" and themselves "die Deutsche"?
    • Favorite 29 August 2020
      bobjonkman favorited something by eloquence: Disturbing reports that Google Play is threatening to kick out Mastodon apps. See:https://mastodon.social/@Gargron/104763960269049818https://toot.fedilab.app/@fedilab/104765191594914330App stores have a track record of acting capriciously & are also easy targets for gov't censors (including Trump). This is why alternatives like @fdroidorg are so important for user freedom.If unfamiliar: F-Droid is a free & open […]

Archive for November, 2009

Blacklists considered harmful

Posted by Bob Jonkman on 19th November 2009

The black hole that sucks up Internet Addresses

The black hole that sucks up Internet Addresses

BoingBoing points me to a Security Fix article by Brian Krebs called A year later: A look back at McColo on the after-effects of Real-time Blacklists (RBLs) that targeted formerly undesirable IP addresses:

The Internet community typically shuns networks known to harbor spammers and organizations that host malicious software and other nastiness, usually by including their numeric Internet addresses on “blocklists”. Many organizations configure their e-mail servers to reject messages from addresses included on one or more of these blocklists. A heavily blocklisted network quickly becomes unattractive to legitimate businesses, since any e-mail sent out of that network will most likely be refused by the intended recipients.

“The problem is once an address block gets so polluted and absorbed into all these blocklists, it’s difficult to get off all of them because there is no central blocking authority,” said Paul Ferguson, an advanced threat researcher at Trend Micro.

(“Blocklist” is a less pejorative term for “Blacklist”)

The problem is not with the (formerly) malicious site, nor with the keepers of the blacklists, or even the lack of a central blocking authority. The problem is with e-mail server admins or firewall admins who let some unpaid, unaccountable blacklist censor their incoming mail or access to Web pages.

A blacklist should be just one of the criteria used to weight the probability that an incoming e-mail message is spam, or that an http stream contains malware. When I use a blacklist I’ll take into account the blacklist’s opinion of an IP source, but I don’t want a blacklist deciding what I can or can’t receive.

It’s far more reliable to actually examine the content stream for spam or malware instead of relying on a third-party’s opinion of an IP address. Yes, this increases the transaction cost for managing spam and malware, but as these blacklist IP address areas increase there’s an ever greater chance of false positives.

Are you using blacklists? Still think they’re a good idea? Wait until your blacklist gets compromised. An attacker takes control of a blacklist, but doesn’t interfere with its regular operations. Instead, it selectively adds and removes addresses. What better way to impose a DoS attack than maliciously subscribing your target to a well-known blacklist? In fact, for the long con I can see an attacker setting up a blacklist site, and spending a year or two building a reputation. As long as system admins rely completely on that blacklist to block certain IP addresses, those system admins are vulnerable to the whims of the blacklist operator.

I also wrote about the role of blacklists in Blocking Port 25 Considered Harmful, just under a year ago.

–Bob.

(Flickr image “Black Hole” by he who shall used under creative commons license)

Posted in considered harmful, dnsbl | Comments Off on Blacklists considered harmful

Deep Packet Inspection considered harmful

Posted by Bob Jonkman on 13th November 2009

Ripe for Deep Packet Inspection

Ripe for Deep Packet Inspection

Michael Geist points us to a Sandvine report analyzing global broadband traffic.

Far more interesting than the data presented by Sandvine is the fact that Sandvine has any data to present at all. How did they get this stuff? Did they buy it from Bell and Rogers? Does their throttling equipment phone home? I don’t recall giving them permission to use my data.

They claim they’re not looking at data content. Maybe that’s true, maybe it’s not. But they’ve inspected deeply enough to know that we use more streaming applications than P2P, and more Bittorrent than Gnutella. As any data analyst knows, traffic analysis of data patterns gives as much information as the data itself. Why are they allowed to gather any of this data at all? None of their business what I use on my computer.

I’m sure Sandvine is making a hefty buck selling this report, or at least using it as evidence to sell more of their DPI equipment. They’re profiting from the the data that I didn’t give them permission to use. I think the Privacy Commissioner may want to look into this.

–Bob.

Posted in considered harmful, Deep Packet Inspection, privacy | Comments Off on Deep Packet Inspection considered harmful

 
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